Category Archives: Photography

Photos: Winners of Sanctuary Wildlife’s Photography Awards

Hell is Here: The heat from the fire scorches their delicate skin as mother and child attempt to flee the mob. In the lead, the cow’s expansive ears are angled forward as she stoicly ignores the crowd of jeering men. Behind her, her calf screams in confusion and fear as the fire licks at her feet. Flaming tar balls and crackers fly through the air to a soundtrack of human laughter and shouts. In the Bankura district of West Bengal this sort of humiliation of pachyderms is routine, as it is in the other elephant-range states of Assam, Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Tamil Nadu and more. India is the world’s stronghold for the Asian elephant and boasts over 70 per cent of the global population of the species. But this achievement rings hollow as vital elephant habitats and routes continue to be ravaged, and human-elephant conflict escalates to a fatal degree. The ignorance and bloodlust of mobs that attack herds for fun, is compounded by the plight of those that actually suffer damage to land, life and property by wandering elephants and the utter indifference of the central and state government to recognise the crisis that is at hand. For these smart, gentle, social animals who have roamed the sub-continent for centuries, hell is now and here.

[AOL.com}- A horrific photo of a mother and baby elephant fleeing an angry mob in West Bengal, India, has won the top award in a wildlife photography competition.

The hard-to-look-at image, taken by photographer Biplab Hazra, shows the two panicked pachyderms desperately trying to flee a large group of laughing men who are hurling flaming tar balls and firecrackers at the creatures.

Hazra’s photo captures the exact moment one of the flaming weapons makes contact with the baby elephant, lighting the helpless animal’s hind legs on fire while it screams out in pain.

In his entry to Sanctuary Wildlife’s Photography awards, Hazra writes that this is sadly not an uncommon scene in India, “the world’s stronghold for the Asian elephant.”

The heat from the fire scorches their delicate skin as mother and child attempt to flee the mob. In the lead, the cow’s expansive ears are angled forward as she stoicly ignores the crowd of jeering men. Behind her, her calf screams in confusion and fear as the fire licks at her feet. Flaming tar balls and crackers fly through the air to a soundtrack of human laughter and shouts. In the Bankura district of West Bengal this sort of humiliation of pachyderms is routine.

Hazra said that, although India boasts 70 percent of the global population of the Asian elephant, vital elephant habitats and routes are often ravaged by human beings and the “human-elephant conflict” has escalated to a fatal degree.

“The ignorance and bloodlust of mobs that attack herds for fun, is compounded by the plight of those that actually suffer damage to land, life and property by wandering elephants and the utter indifference of the central and state government to recognize the crisis that is at hand,” he wrote. “For these smart, gentle, social animals who have roamed the sub-continent for centuries, hell is now and here.”

It remains unknown what became of the two elephants seen in the award-winning photo.

Hazra’s devastating image was recognized by Sanctuary, India’s leading nature and conservation portal. The organization says it aims to “communicate to readers the rationale for wildlife conservation and environmental protection with a focus on the Indian subcontinent.”

In the years since its inception, the group claims to have been at the fulcrum of innumerable wildlife conservation campaigns, conservation project and serves as a forum for wildlife groups, concerned individuals and non-profit organizations in the country.

Below are the photos of some of the winning photos.

Photos: National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Highlights

“The image was taken from Hallstat Village in Austria right after sunrise. I had to walk some distance to reach this village view point.” (Shanof K. / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)

[Yahoo News}- From the heights of the Arctic to the depths of Africa, week two of the National Geographic Nature photographer of the year contest features a range of Earth’s most fascinating and beautiful creatures and landscapes.

The annual competition is split into four subsections: Wildlife, Landscapes, Underwater and Aerials.

A winner will be selected from each category at the end of November, before one overall winner is selected in December.

Patrick Witty, National Geographic’s Deputy Director of Digital Photography, said of the competition so far: “The strength and diversity of the submitted photos are always astounding, and this contest gives those incredible entries a platform that is seen by millions ­– including National Geographic’s photo editors.”

Here are some of the best entries so far.

Beautiful Scenery of Cameron Highlands

Cameron Highlands is not only about strawberries and flower gardens, the beautiful scenery and landscapes, and the greenery is something we cannot easily find in the city.

Unfortunately, the commercial farms have somehow spoilt the greenery of the highlands.

These photos are taken during my brief visit to Cameron Highlands two days ago.

Beautiful Perfectly Timed Photos That Tell A Different Story

I See Your Supermoon Shot, I Raise You This Supermoon Shot In Dubai

I found this stunning photos on the internet.

Snapped at the right moment, it gives a hilarious coincidence or a beautiful illusion to other wise just ordinary photos.

Photos: National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year – The Winners

[Yahoo News}- Exploding volcanoes, sprawling urban landscapes and eerie underwater scenes are among the staggeringly beautiful moments captured by the winners of the 2017 National Geographic Travel photographer of the year competition.

A once-in-a-lifetime moment provided the subject for the winning image, taken by photographer Sergio Tapiro Velasco.

As he stood just 12 kilometres away from the molten summit of Mexico’s Volcán de Colima volcano, a bolt of lightning snapped from the sky onto the crater.

When he realised what he had managed to capture, Sergio was shocked.

‘When I looked on the camera display, all I could do was stare,’ he said.

‘What I was watching was impossible to conceive, the image showed those amazing forces of nature interacting on a volcano, while the lightning brightened the whole scene.

‘It’s an impossible photograph and my once in a lifetime shot that shows the power of nature.’

His picture was crowned the winner out of more than 15,000 entries submitted by photographers hailing from 30 countries.

This year’s competition was judged by Molly Roberts, senior photography editor at National Geographic; Benjamin Lowy, award-winning adventure and underwater photographer; and Jody MacDonald, award-winning adventure sport and documentary photographer.

Molly said: ‘The quality of submissions in the 2017 Travel Photographer of the Year contest was wonderfully eclectic.

‘I was inspired by the variety of locations and creativity of the photographers in their quest to make compelling images.’

Click here to see some of the submissions for the Cities Category.

Photos: National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year 2017

This spectacular view of Frankfurt is the perfect example of the modern city at night. (Pic: Vitaly Pankratov)

[Yahoo News}- Cities can often be looked at negatively, full of unsightly buildings and coloured by smog.

However, they can also be dazzling, scenic sights that provide stunning backdrops good enough to be framed.

National Geographic has compiled a group of photos taken in cities across the globe – and the sights on display are jaw-dropping.

From sprawling urban jungles to dazzling lights to incredible examples of modern architecture, each photo is vying to be crowned the cities photo of the year.

Here are just some of the entries in this year’s contest:

(Photos) The Winners of This Year’s iPhone Photography Awards

[Yahoo News}- When it comes to taking photos on our iPhones, most of us are happy to take a snap that is remotely worthy of Instagram – before being modified with a dozen filters to ensure that we secure those all important likes.

But when it comes to the annual iPhone photography awards, it’s all a little different – with winners that are capable of capturing incredible shots of everyday life on earth.

Here’s a snapshot of this year’s winners.